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Friday, October 16, 2020 | History

2 edition of Control of DNA replication in Xenopus laevis. found in the catalog.

Control of DNA replication in Xenopus laevis.

James Paul Jonathon Chong

Control of DNA replication in Xenopus laevis.

by James Paul Jonathon Chong

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Published by University of Manchester in Manchester .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D.), University of Manchester, School of Biological Sciences.

ContributionsUniversity of Manchester. School of Biological Sciences.
The Physical Object
Pagination172p.
Number of Pages172
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16764840M

; (First ed.). Cold Spring Harbor: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press. Early Development of Xenopus Laevis: A Laboratory Manual. Tim Hunt (University of Cambridge, GB) or Randall W. King (Harvard University, USA). 3. DNA replication and repair in Xenopus. Julian J. Blow (University of Dundee, Wellcome Trust Centre for Gene Regulation & Expression, GB) or Marcel Mechali (IGH, CNRS, Montpellier, France). 4. Gene expression in Xenopus laevis development and nuclear transfer.

Xp53 in regulation of this specific DNA binding activity. We thus assessed the behavior of Xp53 toward various DNA binding sites of human origin as no Xenopus p53 response genes have been cloned so far. Hp53 was used as a control in all these experiments. Hp53 produced in . In Vitro DNA Replication. Sperm chromatin was incubated at 1–3 ng DNA/μl extract supplemented with an energy-regenerating system (Blow and Laskey, ), μg/ml cycloheximide, 2 mM ATP, and μM histone H1c or an equivalent volume of amount of H1 added to extract is comparable to the estimated amount of somatic linker histone present in a Xenopus embryo at the gastrula.

Xenopus cell-free extracts and their contribution to the study of DNA replication and other complex biological processes J. JULIAN BLOW*,1 2and RONALD A. LASKEY 1School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee and 2Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK ABSTRACT Here we discuss the important contributions that cell-free extracts have made to theCited by: 8. During the very early stages of embryonic development chromosome replication occurs under rather challenging conditions, including a very short cell cycle, absence of transcription, a relaxed DNA damage response and, in certain animal species, a highly contracted S-phase. This raises the puzzling question of how the genome can be faithfully replicated in such a peculiar metabolic by: 4.


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Control of DNA replication in Xenopus laevis by James Paul Jonathon Chong Download PDF EPUB FB2

Keywords: Cell Cycle, Checkpoint Control, DNA Replication, PP2A, Xenopus, B55α, Checkpoint Kinase, Midblastula Transition, Nucleus/Cytoplasm Ratio Introduction During early embryonic development in many animals, including Xenopus laevis, Drosophila melanogaster, and Caenorhabditis elegans, cell cycle duration is controlled by the nucleus Cited by: DNA Replication in Xenopus Ability to Respond - to S phase signals - + Licensing SPF Figure 2 Model to explain replication control in the Xenopus system.

A single nucleus is shown as it passes through a complete cell cycle. During late mitosis, prior to nuclear envelope assembly, the DNA becomes "licensed" (+) to undergo DNA replication.

The African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis, also known as the xenopus, African clawed toad, African claw-toed frog or the platanna) is a species of African aquatic frog of the family name is derived from the three short claws on each hind foot, which it uses to tear apart its food.

The word Xenopus means "strange foot" and laevis means "smooth". Class: Amphibia. Xenopus (/ ˈ z ɛ n ə p ə s /) (Gk., ξενος, xenos=strange, πους, pous=foot, commonly known as the clawed frog) is a genus of highly aquatic frogs native to sub-Saharan species are currently described within it.

The two best-known species of this genus are Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis, which are commonly studied as model organisms for developmental biology Class: Amphibia. Written and edited by experts in the field, this collection from Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology covers all aspects of DNA replication and its control across all domains of life.

The contributors examine the molecular machinery involved in the assembly of replication origin complexes, the establishment of replication forks, unzipping. 1. EMBO J. Jul 2;20(13) Control of chromosomal DNA replication in the early Xenopus embryo. Blow JJ(1). Author information: (1)CRC Chromosome Replication Research Group, Wellcome Trust Biocentre, University of Dundee, Dow Street, Dundee DD1 5EH, UK.

@ PMCID: PMCCited by: Differentiation () Differentiation @> Springer-Verlag Replication, integration and expression of exogenous DNA injected into fertilized eggs of Xenopus laevis Laurence D.

Etkin'*, Bradley Pearman', Mary Roberts', and Susan L. Bektesh' Department of Zoology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TNUSA Department of Genetics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Cited by: This has been possible following the development of a cell-free extract of Xenopus eggs (Lohka and Masui, ) that can support the efficient initiation and completion of chromosomal DNA replication in vitro (Blow and Laskey, ; Blow and Watson, ).Author: J.

Julian Blow, Paul Nurse. This chapter primarily focuses on extracts that replicate DNA and assemble nuclei in of Xenopus laevis have proved to be exceptionally favorable sources of cell-free systems for studying chromosome replication and assembly of the cell nucleus.

Systems are developed that assemble nucleosomes and nuclear envelopes on purified DNA, decondense highly compact sperm chromatin, Cited by:   Summary. Extracts derived from Xenopus laevis eggs represent a powerful cell-free system to study eukaryotic DNA replication. A variation of the system allows for DNA replication not only in a cell-free environment, but also in the absence of a by: Hello.

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The Xenopus egg extract has become the gold standard for in vitro studies of metazoan DNA replication. We have used this system to study the mechanisms that ensure rapid and complete DNA. Regulated Formation of Extrachromosomal Circular DNA Molecules during Development in Xenopus laevis Article (PDF Available) in Molecular and Cellular Biology 19(10).

RESULTS. Shorter S Phase at Low Nuclei Concentration Is Due to More Synchronous Origin Firing and Faster Fork Progression— When sperm nuclei are incubated in Xenopus egg extracts, there is an initial lag period of ∼25 min during which replication origins are assembled on DNA and replication-competent nuclei are produced.

After this lag, S phase starts abruptly. In Xenopus laevis, early embryonic development consists of twelve rapid cleavage cycles between DNA replication (S) and mitosis (M) without checkpoints or gap phases. However, checkpoints are engaged in Xenopus once the embryo reaches the midblastula transition (MBT).

At this point, the embryo initiates transcription, acquires gap phases Author: Nassiba Adjerid. Regulation of DNA replication in Xenopus laevis Jing Fang Iowa State University Follow this and additional works at: Part of theCell Biology Commons, and theGenetics Commons This Dissertation is brought to you for free and open access by the Iowa State University Capstones, Theses and Dissertations at Iowa State.

DNA replication in the embryo of Xenopus laevis changes dramatically at the mid-blastula transition (MBT), with Y RNA-independent random initiation switching to Y RNA-dependent initiation at specific origins.

Here, we identify xNuRD, an MTA2-containing assemblage of the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylation complex NuRD, as an essential factor in pre-MBT Xenopus embryos that Cited by: 6. Single-molecule analysis of DNA replication in Xenopus egg extracts Hasan Yardimci1, Anna B. Loveland1, Antoine M.

van Oijen2,§,*, and Johannes C. Walter1,§,* 1Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA 2The Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

DNA replication is an important yet complicated process that requires not only accurate and efficient DNA synthesis but also genome-wide coordination among replicative pro-teins A. DNA replication in eukaryotic cells1. In a time that can be as short as a few minutes, all of a cell’s O bases of DNA must be replicated once and only once 2, by:   Abstract.

The complete sequence of nucleotide Xenopus laevis mitochondrial genome has been determined. A comparison of this amphibian mitochondrial genomic sequence with those of the mammalian mitochondrial genomes reveals a similar gene order and.

Xenopus, the African clawed frog, is one of the three most widely cited vertebrate animals in the biological literature, yet almost all knowledge is based on laboratory experience of a single species, Xenopus laevis from South : Hardcover.Start studying Bio chapter 17 hw. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

You digest DNA from the frog Xenopus laevis with an enzyme that produces sticky DNA ends. You can ligate your DNA to: (check all that apply) Both DNA replication and PCR require: (check all that apply) 1,3.

DNA polymerase.African clawed frog Xenopus laevis [13–16]. Large amounts of material required for deep proteomic experiments (> mgof protein) can be obtained easily from X.

laevis samples but would be very hard or impossible to obtain from other model organisms (e.g., staged embryonic time series or undiluted, metaphase-arrested cytoplasm called egg File Size: 1MB.